YAMAS AND NIYAMAS – 01.27.15 (SANTOSHA – The Paradox of Not Seeking)

I am guilty of trying to fit a ridiculous amount of challenges, successes, failures and opportunities into my moments.  I love to experience as much as possible, but at the expense of being content.  For a number of years, I would revisit the past and argue with myself over time lost here and time lost there.  However, my thinking has changed.  Each and every one of those moments is framed in ice.  They sit there for me to see as they are.  They cannot be thawed out and manipulated into what I may think is more beneficial or pleasing.  They are there…forever.

Where I can find joy is in the moment that lies presently.  I use this blog to send out my thoughts to those I meet physically and digitally in hopes that my research and struggles may help in some way.  Writing on here takes time.  I’m not a fabulous writer, but I rest in the fact that my writing is honest and sincere.  This moment that I type right now I could be on my bike trainer, I could be doing some dirty dishes, or I could still be asleep.  I chose this moment for myself and for you.  Be content with each moment and fall in love with you.

SANTOSHA – The Paradox of Not Seeking

Discontentment is the illusion that there can be something else in the moment.  There isn’t and there can’t be.  The moment is complete.  That means if I am bored or sad, I will only be discontented if I am not content to be bored and sad.  Building contentment with boredom, sadness, impatience, depression, disappointment, and loss, builds our ability to be that tall tree so rooted in the earth that great winds cannot topple it.  Being content with our discontentment is itself a gateway to the calm depths within.

Santosha, or contentment, is performing duty and right action with pure joy.  It is the true understanding that there is nothing more that can or does exist that this very moment.  When we are purely in the moment, the moment is complete.

Scholars have learned that there is nothing missing; life is complete the way it comes to us in each moment.  When we understand this, we sink into contentment.

Book – “The Yamas and Niyamas” by Deborah Adele

YAMAS AND NIYAMAS – 01.20.15 (Santosha – Gratitude)

Western culture is built upon comparison.  I compare what I have to what you have.  In that comparison comes a number a number of responses such as jealousy, greed, stress, anger, frustration and the list goes on.  The possessions we do not have play so many tricks on us.

The “Thank You” game is fun to play.  However, don’t dip into the past and resist being thankful for the future.  Play the “Thank You” game in the Now.  What do you find yourself thankful for right now as you read this?  I am thankful for an open mind.  I am thankful for my health.  I am thankful for my love of helping others.  Your response may be similar to mine or completely different.  But I challenge you to stay in the present and play the game.  The results are quite interesting …

True joy and gratitude doesn’t come from the next possession, but rather the level of contentment we have with our true self.  When we let go of the image we believe others want to see and remove pettiness and smallness from our lives, there we will find true contentment with who we are.  Our own unique true self.  You’re beautiful.

Santosha – Gratitude

Let’s play the thank you game.  I had no idea what the thank you game was, but I began to search hard for clues and cracks and pauses in which I could, with some kind of honesty, say thank you to life.  What I discovered turned my world upside down.  It wasn’t long before my step was lighter and slowly almost everything began to bring a smile to my face and words of gratitude to my heart.  I was alive again, and my life was enchanting.

Practicing gratitude protects us from our own pettiness and smallness and keeps us centered in the joy and abundance of our own life.  When stimulation pulls at us and disturbance beckons us, it is the gratitude uttered from our lips that keeps us strongly rooted in contentment.

Book – “The Yamas and Niyamas” by Deborah Adele